Safari-ing: Fishing Villages

During our full day in Queen Elizabeth National Park, we saw two different fishing villages.

When this land was set aside to be a national park, these villages had nowhere to go, and the people eventually were allowed to stay.

So they live within the boundaries of the park, surrounded by their traditional culture and customs, wild animals in their backyard that most of us visit a zoo to see, and a steady stream of mzungus traipsing past.

The first village we saw was on our game drive in the morning.  We drove through it to see hippos sleeping near shore.  I should probably point out that these hippos were incredibly close to where the people were.  Scary!

Also, be sure to check out the short little video of our drive through the fishing village.  My favorite is the pool table in the little shanty.  I saw these everywhere in Uganda – including one in my neighborhood in Kampala.  But the video totally gives a much greater sense of place than these photos…

One sad fact I remember Joseph sharing with us on our drive through is that on average, one child from the village school is eaten by a lion each year.

We saw the second fishing village in the afternoon when we were on our boat ride on the Kazinga Channel, between Lake George and Lake Edward.  The men were just preparing to head out for their afternoon fishing trip.

The biggest threats to this village are hippos and crocodiles, both of which we saw plenty of while we were travel along the channel.  My favorite part of their boats is the leaf-shaped paddles.

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